How To Examine Your Cat’s Eyes

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How To Examine Your Cat's EyesPhoto © ivan kmit – Fotolia.com

We found a great article on examining your cat’s eyes. The link is after our commentary as per usual.



Whether they come in blue, green, or golden colors, cat’s eyes are mystical gems that glimmer and reflect beams of light in the dark. And in reality, they truly are gems – that is, for your cat. The eyes are precious complex organs that not only enable the cat to acutely see in daylight but also stalk its prey in low-light conditions.

In almost every aspect, cat’s eyes are very similar to those of humans, except for some tissues that grant night vision to the cat. Cat’s pupils are also larger than ours and are controlled by a pair of shutter-like muscles. This gives the eyes of cats their distinctive slit-like pupils during bright light.



Your cat’s eyes are very delicate orbs, unique features in terms of anatomy and thus require extra care and special attention during examination and administration of eye medication. Cats normally do not have as many ocular concerns as dogs do, but there are conditions that can only occur in feline species. A few eye diseases can even persist for months. Infections are common wherein bacteria accumulate in the discharges around the eye.

During eye examination or medication, it is important to note abnormal findings worthy of a visit to the vet’s office. For you to accomplish that, you need to be at least aware of what’s considered “normal.” In general, the eyes should be moist, clear, and free from any redness, cloudiness, discharges, tearing, or swelling.

Several eye disorders of cats can be resolved with vet-recommended drops and ointments. For infection, antibiotic ointments such as Terramycin ophthalmic ointment are prescribed. Administering medicine drops into the eye can be a tricky procedure and often necessitates several attempts before a successful eye drop can make its way into the pouch.

For some tips on eye ointment and drop administration and techniques on gently but firmly retraining your cat, the reader is referred to: http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/ClientED/cat_eyes.aspx

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